Forgo or Forego?

Forgo forego.png

Forgo and forego look very similar, so it makes sense that this is a common spelling error. In this post, I will give you their definitions and explain a mnemonic device to help you remember the difference.

definition of forgo

Merriam-Webster Unabridged

Forgo (without the E) means to go without something. You give something up and you refuse it.

Here are a couple examples of forgo in a sentence:

  • Declaring a diet, the rat says he will forgo cheese.
  • Because she broke her foot, Nancy forwent dancing.

Forwent, as you can see from the second example, is the past-tense version of forgo.

definition of forego

Merriam-Webster Unabridged

Forego (with the E) means to go before something. You may recognize this word from the popular term foregone conclusion, which means a conclusion that someone can predict before the action happens.

Here are a couple examples of forego in a sentence:

  • The introduction forgoes the first chapter.
  • The contest forewent the medal ceremony.

Forewent is the past tense of forego.

Mnemonic device: To remember the difference between these words, link the word before with forego.

Forego means to go before something.

 Remember that and there are two fewer words you can get confused!

Erin Servais is a book editor and author coach focusing on women author-entrepreneurs and their publishing goals. To learn more about her business and how she can help you, click the link: Dot and Dash LLC.

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